Prevention of CKD

There is an increased risk of developing CKD when one or more risk factors are evident in relation to someone who has no risk factor.

  • Is there anything I can do to reduce the risk of developing CKD?
  • Of course! The goal is to intervene on the modifiable risk factors and to eliminate or control them as much as possible to reduce their "effect" on the kidneys.
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  • More specifically what should I do?
  • -If there is a long-term illness such as diabetes mellitus or hypertension, the best measure for your kidneys is to better control and regulate these illnesses. Keep blood pressure and glycosylated hemoglobin at an ideal level with the help of your nephrologist (blood pressure <140mmHg or for others <130mmHg and glycosylated <6.5-7%).
  • -Take your medication in a timely manner as your doctor has recommended.
  • -Stop smoking immediately.
  • -Exercise regularly (walk half an hour every day).
  • -Reduce alcohol consumption (about 10 small glasses of wine are allowed).
  • -Avoid unnecessary use of painkillers, especially non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.
  • -Follow a balanced diet with lots of fruits and vegetables, moderate amounts of starch (potatoes, rice, pasta), moderate amounts of meat, fish, eggs and small amounts of fats, salt and sugar.
  • -Find the ideal target weight for you (following your physician’s advice)
  • -Check your cholesterol, as your doctor recommends.
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  • What test should I take annually to prevent nephropathy?
  • -Control for albuminuria: a simple urine test that controls the amount of albumin in the urine (when elevated it is indicative of nephropathy).
  • -Estimation of glomerular filtration rate (based on creatinine).
  • -Measurement of blood pressure.
  • -Measurement of blood glucose.
  • -Measurement of cholesterol.
  • -Measurement of your body weight and calculation of the ideal weight for you.
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  • What are the things I need to know and discuss with my doctor?
  • Discuss with your doctor the following:
  • • Your lifestyle / exercise / smoking / drinking habits.
  • • Your medical (kidney) history as well as the factors that are evident and may burden it.
  • • The treatment goals for each individual topic (hypertension, sugar, hyperlipidemia).
  • • Medications and what side effects it may have.
  • • Medications that can "hurt" your kidney.
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  • Bibliography
  • 1. Perico N, Remuzzi G. Need for chronic kidney disease prevention programs in disadvantaged populations. Clin Nephrol. 2015;83(7 Suppl 1):42-8. Review.
  • 2. Sinha AD, Agarwal R. The complex relationship between CKD and ambulatory blood pressure patterns. Adv Chronic Kidney Dis. 2015 Mar;22(2):102-7. doi: 10.1053/j.ackd.2015.01.003. Review. PubMed PMID: 25704346.
  • 3. Jain N, Reilly RF. Effects of dietary interventions on incidence and progression of CKD. Nat Rev Nephrol. 2014 Dec;10(12):712-24. doi: 10.1038/nrneph.2014.192. Epub 2014 Oct 21. Review.
  • 4. Whitham D. Nutrition for the prevention and treatment of chronic kidney disease in diabetes. Can J Diabetes. 2014 Oct;38(5):344-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jcjd.2014.07.222. Epub 2014 Sep 4. Review.
  • 5. Khan UA, Garg AX, Parikh CR, Coca SG. Prevention of chronic kidney disease and subsequent effect on mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS One.  2013 Aug 29;8(8):e71784. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0071784. eCollection 2013. Review.
  • 6. Johansen KL, Painter P. Exercise in individuals with CKD. Am J Kidney Dis. 2012 Jan;59(1):126-34. doi: 10.1053/j.ajkd.2011.10.008. Epub 2011 Nov 23. Review. PubMed PMID: 22113127; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3242908.
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